Henry Clews Award Master Residency Program

Will Cotton, inaugural master artist Henry Clews award, at the Château de La Napoule, October 2017

2017 Henry Clews Award
Master Residency Program

In recognition of Henry Clews’ lifelong dedication to developing his own work, this residency program is guided by an accomplished artist who leads intensive workshops with select artists for a month at the Château de La Napoule.

Launched in October 2017, artists Ivy Haldeman, Hilary Harkness, David Humphrey and Anastasiya Tarasenko participated with master artist and LNAF Alumnus, Will Cotton. This residency program will be awarded again in 2019.

 


Ivy Haldeman

Ivy Haldeman

Ivy Haldeman (b. Aurora, CO) received her Bachelor of Fine Arts from New York’s Cooper Union, and has continued her art practice in Brooklyn, NY. Her most recent paintings engage the sensual and idle world of an anthropomorphized hotdog. Drawing from a wide range of influences, including Hellenistic sculpture, Japanese Ukiyo-e prints, and contemporary painting, her work seeks new humanisms through explorations of the corporeal and the quotidian. Haldeman’s work has been reviewed in the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal. Recent solo exhibitions include, Breathless (Colossus), Royal Nonesuch Gallery, Oakland, CA (2017); Ivy Haldeman, Mayor Projects, Aarhus, DK (2017). She has also exhibited at Paul Kasmin Gallery, Romeo Gallery and DTN Gallery in New York.


Hilary Harkness

Hilary Harkness

Hilary Harkness, who exhibits with the Mary Boone Gallery in New York City, is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of the University of California-Berkeley (where she studied biochemistry and art) and holds a Master of Fine Arts from the Yale University School of Art. A former professional violinist, she honed her unique artistic worldview while living in San Francisco, and now lives and works in Brooklyn. Her work has been exhibited worldwide, including the Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid, Spain, and the Deste Foundation in Athens, Greece and is in the collection of the Whitney Museum. Harkness has been featured in publications including the New York Times, The New Yorker, Interview magazine, and Esquire. She has taught painting and sculpture as Artist in Residence at Yale Summer School of Art and Music, and lectured widely at institutions such as Columbia University, Boston University, Yale University, Brandeis University, and the Baltimore Museum of Art. In 2013, Hilary co-curated Roy Lichtenstein: Nudes and Interiors at FLAG Art Foundation. Hilary also blogs for the Huffington Post.


David Humphrey

David Humphrey

“Our daily commitment to observational work in the glow of the Mediterranean and Henry Clews could not be reproduced anywhere. The sustained dialog with a small group of artists while developing new work in the studio was very productive and rare.” —David Humphrey

Though his paintings, works on paper, and sculptures defy categorization, David Humphrey emerged as an artist in the late 1970s along with Postmodernism, an approach that continues to inform his heterogeneous compositions, visual pastiches that, in his words, “erase the breaks” between divergent styles. As he explains: “I suppose that the dynamic of relationship—the psychology of bonding, lovemaking, attachment, and so on—has kept me interested for a long time. I come back to it as a way to thicken the grammar of picture making.” In his paintings, this grammar includes gestural abstraction, cartoonish figuration, Pop Art, Surrealism, and Expressionism. His vibrant compositions feature human figures, narrative vignettes, animals, and objects interwoven into abstract passages. They read as sexually and psychologically charged dreamscapes, through which Humphrey breaks down boundaries to explore our relationships with each other and the world.


Anastasiya Tarasenko

Anastasiya Tarasenko

Having been born in a major Soviet city right before it’s collapse and coming to America at the age of 6 means that the question, “Where are you from?” is cause for a particular kind of anxiety. I am a Ukrainian who only speaks Russian, a Jew from a country that didn’t want them, and an American who wasn’t born in America. This kind of multi-national identity coupled with spending most of my life in New York City has shaped me in a myriad of interesting ways that I enjoy exploring in my art. Although not all of my paintings and sculptures are overtly political, they do all examine humanity in its most basic form: shitting, eating, fucking, and begging. This common thread, which links us all, has no room for lofty ideals of marxism or the righteous individualism of capitalism. We are, in essence, a mass of animals attempting to survive on a blue planet floating through the unfathomable depths of space. This may sound grand and grave, and it is, but I also can’t help but notice a certain cosmic humor to it all, a humor I love to sprinkle into everything I make. ​